Prof. Wagner and Linda Glawe presented their current research in the USA

From 3rd – 11th of January Prof. Wagner and Linda Glawe presented their current research in the USA. They presented their new paper “A Stylized Model of China’s Growth Since 1978” at the 2018 ASSA Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (the program is available here). Furthermore, Prof. Wagner held, on invitation, a workshop at the IMF in Washington, D.C. about “China and the Middle-Income Trap” where he and Miss Glawe presented their latest papers and research results.

Prof. Dr. Wagner was honored by the FernUniversität in Hagen

Due to his 40th-year jubilee in the public service , Prof. Dr. Helmut Wagner was honored by Prof. Dr. Ada Pellert, the rector of the Fernuniversität in Hagen. Prof. Dr. Pellert especially emphasized Prof. Wagner’s value for the FernUniversität as an internationally highly recognized researcher. In 1976, he earned his doctoral degree at the University of Regensburg. In 1982 he took the position of a full professor at an university in Hamburg. Since 1995 he is full professor and chair holder of macroeconomics at the Fernuniversität Hagen, moreover he is the head of the macroeconomic section in the institute  “Hagener Managementstudien” and head of the Center for East Asia Macroeconomic Studies (CEAMeS).

Particularly Prof. Dr. Wagner’s remarkable international cooperation and his numerous, worldwide research trips were highlighted by Prof. Dr. Pellert. Besides of regular invitations by the International Monetary Fund, he has hold numerous visiting positions at other renowned institutions such as Princeton University, MIT, US Fed or the Bank of Japan. Prof. Dr. Pellert considers Prof. Dr. Wagner as a role model for other researchers because of his great number of international contacts.

If you want to read the full article in German, you can find it here.


Prof. Wagner (r) ist honored by Prof. Pellert (l) (Source: FernUniversität in Hagen)

CEAMeS updated its conference section

We updated the conference section of our website and added six conferences (you can find them here). They all deal with East-Asian topics in one way or another, and take place in 2018. Following the corresponding link beneath each conference, you will reach the associated conference homepage. There you can find all useful information, such as deadlines, registration information or preliminary programs.

“Value-added exports and U.S. local labor markets: Does China really matter?”

“Value-added exports and U.S. local labor markets: Does China really matter?”

Leilei Shen and Peri Silva

In: European Economic Review, Vol. 101, January 2018, Pages 479-504

In this paper, the main focus is the direct contribution of the Chinese economy to changes in U.S. labor market outcomes. Their strategy follows the insights provided by a model of international trade with G regions, where N of these regions represent commuting zones in the U.S. economy, and where firms in a particular sector and country are assumed to have access to the same technology displaying increasing returns to scale.

“Unified China and Divided Europe”

“Unified China and Divided Europe”

Chiu Yu Ko, Mark Koyama and Tuan-Hwee Sng

In: International Economic Review, January 2018, Vol. 59, No. 1, forthcoming

Throughout much of history,the most economically developed region of the world wasn’t Europe but China, which was typically a unified empire. This paper proposes a unified framework based on Eurasian geography to (a) help explain the different political equilibria in China and Europe, and (b) explore the economic consequences of political centralization and fragmentation.

“Post-disaster aid and development of the manufacturing sector: Lessons from a natural experiment in China”

“Post-disaster aid and development of the manufacturing sector: Lessons from a natural experiment in China”

Erwin Bult, Lih Xu and Xiaobo Zhang

In: European Economic Review, Vol. 101, January 2018, Pages 441-458

Bult et al. adopt a disaggregate approach to study the link between aid and Dutch Disease dynamics, using a natural experiment in China. Specifically, they examine whether post- disaster aid provided to a subsample of Chinese counties, devastated by an earthquake in 2008, affects the sectoral composition of local economies. Using different methods, they consistently find that counties receiving (more) aid —even “nearby counties” not directly damaged by the earthquake —tend to suffer from a contraction of the manufacturing sector.

“Population policies, demographic structural changes, and the Chinese household saving puzzle”

“Population policies, demographic structural changes, and the Chinese household saving puzzle”

Suqin Ge, Dennis Tao Yang, Junsen Zhang

In: European Economic Review, Vol. 101, January 2018, Pages 181 – 209

Household saving rates have increased dramatically over the past two decades in China, in addition to the rise in average saving rate; the age-saving profile has also evolved into an unusual pattern. In this paper, Ge et al. propose and test a new hypothesis that demographic structural changes caused by a series of population control policies since the 1970s have contributed to changes in China’s household saving patterns. Therefor they develop a simple overlapping generation (OLG) model to illustrate the effects of population control policies and demographic structural changes on saving decisions of individuals at different life stages.